ENGIE: Supporting the national COVID-19 effort

ENGIE’s COVID-19 response is structured around three key areas:

“I am exceptionally proud of all our colleagues at ENGIE who continue to demonstrate incredible solidarity and fortitude throughout this challenging time. As well as taking care of each other, they are finding solutions for customers whilst challenging themselves and the business to develop new ways of working. This action has enabled us to maintain absolute continuity in the critical services we operate across the UK, including in our vital roles supporting both the NHS and the National Grid. 

“Already we are seeing a glimpse of a greener future, as well as the significant impact that greater collective action and innovation can have on tackling a global crisis. ENGIE is more committed than ever to making zero carbon happen, which we believe will be central to the future as we look to recover and rebuild, nationally and globally.”

Nicola Lovett, CEO, ENGIE UK & Ireland

Solidarity: with our colleagues and communities

Prioritising the health and wellbeing of ENGIE employees

Financial support for our smaller suppliers

Supporting essential healthcare services and the creation of NHS Nightingale hospitals

Creation of additional critical care beds and COVID-19 rehabilitation units to support NHS demand

Supporting the wider Public Sector and Local Authorities

Reducing management pay to help fund community initiatives

Continuity: keeping critical services moving

Supporting the nation’s electricity supply through grid balancing and supply

Keeping our healthcare system running at this critical time

Maintaining critical transport infrastructure to ensure key workers can travel safely and reliably

Ensuring vital benefit payments are processed

Ensuring our justice system continues to be operational

Ensuring schools can stay open safely

Supporting businesses as they to remobilise their operations

Ingenuity: Innovating and collaborating to make zero carbon happen

Read 'Lockdown's private sector heroes' in The Guardian